Available support for disabilities

Here, the most common types of support for disabilities are described that are available for those who have applied and been granted support.

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Adaptations in the teaching situation

Adaptations during written examinations
Adaptation of course materials
Assistance with making notes
Additional teaching support
Provision of lecture material in advance
Individual study plans
Sound recording
Mentor
Assistance with writing
Support from another student or personnel
Transcription
Educational interpreting

Premises, special equipment and technical support

Adaptation of premises
Group room priority
Special equipment

Adaptations in the teaching situation

Adaptations during written examinations

Examples of adaptations during written examinations are:

  • extended time
  • extended time for submission of assignments
  • access to a computer running special software
  • access to a separate room
  • writing aid who writes down the answers
  • verbal summative assessment instead of summative assessment in writing.

Adaptation of course materials

This involves making the materials available in the format you need. This may involve Braille, tactile images or large print. These materials can also be made available by having someone read the text or scanning and editing the text for reading out loud using speech synthesis.

Assistance with making notes

This means that someone writes down anything that is said during lectures and scheduled seminars.

Additional teaching support

This is a complement to regular teaching. It may involve additional supervision for internships or placements, when writing reports or for clarification of information and study tasks.

Provision of lecture material in advance

To give you an equal opportunity to acquaint yourself with the material used by the teacher, the teacher may provide you with the lecture material in advance.

Individual study plans

This may involve organisational study measures such as adaptation of course organisation and timetables.

Sound recording

Any disabled student who has been granted support is entitled to make audio recordings of lectures. Find more information in Rules on sound recording, photography and filming, etc. in teaching situations found in the Legal Framework at Umeå University.

Mentor

A mentor helps you to improve your study technique and provides assistance on planning and structuring your studies.

Assistance with writing

This involves someone writing down anything that you say when you are unable to do your own writing. Assistance with writing is frequently used in connection with written assignments and summative assessments.

Support from another student or personnel

This may, for example, involve providing visual support by escorting you, providing support for orientation or navigating virtual learning environments. This person may also provide support when equipment needs to be moved between lecture halls.

Transcription

This involves converting videoed teaching into text.

Educational interpreting

This means that sign language interpreting, writing interpreting or deaf-blind interpreting is provided in study-related contexts.

Premises, special equipment and technical support

Adaptation of premises

This may, for example, involve signage, permanent hearing loops, renovation of premises or provision of door openers.

Group room priority

This means that you are entitled to book a group room.

Special equipment

Special equipment available in connection with teaching situations are:

  • adjustable desks and chairs
  • portable hearing loops
  • backrest or seat cushion.

Such equipment can also be used during written examinations.


Page Editor: Annica Höglund

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